Vegan After 40 – Veganism Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is only found naturally in foods from animal sources, so sources for vegans are limited and a vitamin B12 supplement may be needed. If you eat dairy products and eggs, you probably get enough. Vegan sources of vitamin B12 include: yeast extract, such as Marmite, which is fortified with vitamin B12.

The only reliable vegan sources of B12 are foods fortified with B12 (including some plant milks, some soy products, and some breakfast cereals) and B12 supplements, such as our very own VEG 1. Vitamin B12, whether in supplements, fortified foods, or animal products, comes from micro-organisms.

Vegan Sources of Vitamin B12:

Nutritional Yeast.
Marmite + Yeast Spreads.
Fortified Soy + Almond Milk.
Plant-Based Meats.
Fortified Cereals.
Tempeh.
Chlorella.
Nori Seaweed.

All vegans should take 250 mcg per day of a B12 supplement. All lacto-ovo vegetarians should consider taking 250 mcg per day of a B12 supplement a few times per week.

Since B12 is a water-soluble vitamin, it’s generally considered safe, even at high doses. No Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) has been established for B12, due to its low level of toxicity.

Vitamin B12 is not present in plant foods, so people on a plant-based diet need to obtain it through fortified foods and supplements. Foods that are sometimes fortified and may contain vitamin B12 in varying amounts include plant milk, such as soy, almond, oat, cashew, and coconut milk. breakfast cereals.

Not having enough B12 can lead to anemia, which means your body does not have enough red blood cells to do the job. This can make you feel weak and tired. Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause damage to your nerves and can affect memory and thinking.

Once you begin treating your vitamin B12 deficiency, it can take up to six to 12 months to fully recover. It is also common to not experience any improvement during the first few months of treatment.

The common forms of vitamin B include vitamin B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B6 (pyridoxine), and B12 (cyanocobalamin). Except for niacin (when given in high doses), there is no evidence that the other B vitamins, in physiologic or even super-physiologic high doses cause liver injury or jaundice.